Last Year's Exhibitions

The 27th ESC  hosted a total of two exhibitions, where innovative research groups and leading pharmaceutical firms had the opportunity to present their state-of-the-art research on antimicrobial resistance in an interactive manner.

 

The first exhibition took place on September 28th and gave the newest insights into diagnosis and therapy of sepsis as well as technologies for treating patients with systemic inflammation. This was the opportunity to meet with different research groups, NGOs, established companies and start-ups who will cover a range of topics including new treatments targeting resistant pathogens, optimized therapy monitoring to decrease mortality, bedside testing and personalized medicine or projects to overcome the lack of proper resources for new drug development in developing nations.

 

The second exhibition took place on September 29th. This time, the focus lay on innovative approaches regarding the increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance. The presented solutions and technologies ranged from new antibiotic substances and alternative antimicrobial agents to new preventive and diagnostic methods and strategies.

Cluster "Sepsis"

1. Fast Diagnostics – Fast Care

 

[simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Integrated Sepsis Diagnostics – Fast Pathogen Identification and Inflammation Monitoring

CubeDx, Christoph Reschreiter" text="Cube Dx – located in Austria - has developed a complete and entirely new multiplex technology based on the principle of microarrays. The hybcell – the only cylindrical microarray available anywhere – delivers speedy and reliable results with minimal effort. The hyborg – a completely automated device – processes the samples fully independently and without any intervention by the user.Cube Dx’ patient monitoring delivers status reports on several biomarkers which are associated with clinical decisions to be made during treatment of serious infection or inflammation caused by other conditions.The tests have been conceived for the periodic testing of patients in such a manner that the minimum use of samples is involved and a simple and rapid analysis is available. The aim is to deliver a “picture” of the inflammation and organ status which is as complete as possible and which quickly indicates any deterioration in the condition of the patient. Currently the test of 100µL plasma includes simultaneous results in 20 minutes for inflammatory markers like CRP, PCT, IL6, IL8, Serumamyloid A (SAA) and Tachykinin (Substance P) as well as kidney markers like Cystatin C and NGAL. Currently the test panel is enlarged to include liver, heart and brain markers as well. This test will be released at the end of 2016 and be based on whole blood." onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Fighting drug-resistant bacteria – Lab on Disc Screening

SpinDiag, Mark Keller " text="SpinDiag is an innovative start-up, providing an automated point-of-care system for the screening for drug resistant pathogens. The device detects the most prevalent antibiotic resistances. This allows targeted isolation and therapy of infected or colonized patients to avoid spread of resistant pathogens in hospitals. The procedure ensures: I) a fast diagnosis in under 30 Minutes for screening of patients during hospital admission for dangerous bacteria, II) a parallel identification of the 30 most prevalent drug resistances in bacterial pathogens for unparalleled molecular diagnostic knowledge at the point-of-need, III) an affordable bedside-test by using small and portable devices with inexpensive cartridges and avoiding pre-emptive isolation." onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Clinical Septomatics – From Bench to Bedside: Biomarker as Key for Clinical Diagnostics, Prognosis and Drug Evaluation

Professor Brunkhorst, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena, competence network Sepsis (SepNet) " text="One of the most relevant problems of sepsis research today is related to the clinical validation of potential biomarkers. New sepsis biomarkers need to be achieved more quickly, by combined consideration of the results from basic research and clinical findings. Clinical Septomics is a research group, which aims to form this bridge by including professional health on the intensive care unit and the analyses of sepsis biomarkers in blood samples into their research. Join the group, lead by Prof. Brunkhorst, at the exhibition and get to know the three main possible application areas for biomarker diagnosis: I) sensitive and specific molecular biomarkers for an earlier diagnosis, II) disease-related biomarkers as risk indicators and predictive biomarkers in molecular sepsis diagnosis and prognostic estimation, III) drug-related biomarkers to analyse an individual drug response and speed up the approval of new sepsis therapeutics." onload="closed"]

2. Better Care – Better Outcome

 

[simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Novel Treatments of Sepsis-Complications – Nanomedicine

SmartDyeLivery GmbH, Universitätklinikum Jena, Prof. Michael Bauer, Adrian Press" text="Prof. Michael Bauer is deputy head of the department of Anesthesiolgy and intensive care and speaker of the integrated research and treatment center “Sepsis and Sepsisconsequences” at Universitätsklinikum Jena. His research deals with molecular Mechanisms of organ failure during life-threatening infections and the therapy options in this process. Special emphasis is placed on liver failure and diagnostic imaging through biophotonic techniques. He is also founder of SmartDyeLivery, a company that develops and commercialises a unique technology platform for the cell-typeand tissue-specific delivery of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) on the basis of functionalized nanoparticles. So at the exhibition, the group will not only examine the role of sepsis complications for liver failure, but also introduce Nanomedicine to you. Learn how specific drug transport and targeted therapy through Nanoparticles is possible. Explore the functionalization of nanoparticles with dyes for the combination of diagnostic and therapy, with different molecules for specific targeting of various tissues and with different cargos for approaches in additional therapeutic areas. Moreover, the polymer-based nanoparticles can be adapted in size and release kinetics to the specific question. As first core application the team of SmartDyeLivery focusses on the clinical picture of septic cholestasis, a sepsis based organ dysfunction of the liver associated with a very high mortality rate. Beside this first core application and based on the modular principle of the SmartDyeLivery-technology, it can be also used for additional fields of applications. " onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="“From Bed to Bench” – Systems to avoid infections

Becton Dickinson GmbH " text="BD, a global medical technology company, presents some key best practice solutions in patient safety ‘From Bed to Bench’. The presented BD solutions and innovative technologies will range from integrated catheter design to reduce blood stream contamination, surgical hand antiseptic products for infection prevention, optimal specimen collection and medication management systems to minimize medical risk and address all potential failure points, as well as insights into the state-of-the art workflow in blood culturing, identification and susceptibility testing of microorganisms." onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Alternative Sepsis Treatment – Extracorporeal Immunomodulation

Fraunhofer Institut, Artcline

CytoSorb - Sabine Steiner" text="Alternative Sepsis Treatment – Extracorporeal Immunomodulation, Fraunhofer Institut, Artcline

Sepsis, despite the range of modern treatments available, is still associated with a high mortality rate. The ICE therapy fights sepsis by using immune cells provided by healthy donors. Granulocytes are utilized in this process. The donor’s granulocytes partially take over missing functions from the patient’s own dysfunctional immune cells. Inflammatory substances/agents are removed from the patient’s plasma using phagocytosis. Furthermore, immune stimulating substances are produced and released into the patient. This is carried out by an extracorporeal blood circulation procedure, a plasmapheresis and a cell circuit. The granulocytes circulate within the extracorporeal circuit and are not introduced into the patient. The separated plasma obtained from the patient’s blood is continuously transferred into this circuit. Following a period of sufficient contact between the plasma and the granulocytes the treated plasma is once more separated and reintroduced to the patient’s venous blood. This treatment can last for several hours. The aim of the current development process is to create a simple, compact therapy system, similar to a dialysis. A team of the Fraunhofer workgroup “Extrakorporal Immunmodulation” (EXIM) will tie up Prof. Mitzner lecture and present their systems for immune system support, analysis of function and diagnostic methods.

 

CytoSorb - Sabine Steiner

In sepsis, one of the largest indications for CytoSorb, antibiotics are used to control the primary infection, while concurrent use of CytoSorb is designed to help to control the excessive inflammatory response, remove certain bacterial toxins, and avoid cell-mediated injury to otherwise healthy organs.

 

The goal of CytoSorb therapy is to curb the excessive and uncontrolled immune response and to regain control over the course of the disease.

CytoSorb is an extracorporeal blood purification therapy designed to reduce excessive levels of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, or “cytokine storm”, from blood. In doing so, the goal is to reduce the potentially deadly systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) seen in life-threatening inflammatory conditions. Use of the therapy may help to mitigate or even avoid deadly complications such as organ failure in this hyper-inflammatory response, helping to stabilize patients and reduce the severity of illness." onload="closed"]

Cluster "New approaches regarding AMR"

1. Approaches to slow down the development of AMR

 

[simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="“From Bed to Bench” – Systems to avoid infections 

Becton Dickinson GmbH" text="BD, a global medical technology company, presents some key best practice solutions in patient safety ‘From Bed to Bench’. The presented BD solutions and innovative technologies will range from integrated catheter design to reduce blood stream contamination, surgical hand antiseptic products for infection prevention, optimal specimen collection and medication management systems to minimize medical risk and address all potential failure points, as well as insights into the state-of-the art workflow in blood culturing, identification and susceptibility testing of microorganisms. " onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Identification and Modification of Biofilms 

Biofimcenter , German Heart Institute Berlin, PD Dr. Anette Moter, Dr. Judith Kikhney " text="A biofilm consists of a community of microorganisms embedded in a matrix consisting of sugars, nucleic acids and other substances. Thereby the biofilm is protected against immune cells or antibiotics which makes biofilm-associated diseases more difficult to treat. The National Institutes of Health state that about 80 % of all infections can be ascribed to biofilms. Dr. Kikhney and Dr. Moter from the Biofilmcenter, German Heart Institute Berlin, investigate and diagnose these biofilm infections and develop improved therapeutic concepts against them. Join our exhibition to explore the world of biofilms and prospective therapeutical concepts by looking through a microscope!" onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Bacteria Sensing – Diagnostic Patches

University of Siegen, Department of Chemistry & Biology, Prof. Schönherr " text="The rapid, selective and cost-efficient detection of pathogenic bacteria above a critical colonization threshold, e.g. in wounds, via bacterial enzyme-, toxin- or autoinducer responsive materials, including tailored nanocapsules and hydrogel film prototypes developed, e.g. in the consortia BacterioSafe and SmartWound, will be introduced as a promising strategy to avoid erroneous or unnecessary administration of antibiotics. Coupled with closely related therapeutic approaches, these autonomously responsive materials may contribute in the future as “theranostic” solutions (combining therapy & diagnostics) to address the threat of multiply resistant bacteria. In addition, applications in point-of-care medical settings, water hygiene or also food storage can be envisioned. " onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="SORMAS – the future of epidemic surveillance

Helmholtz Institute for Infectious Diseases,  Mr. Tom-Aba " text="The Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa requires to strengthen the disease surveillance and control capabilities. In October 2014, the Helmholtz Center for Infectious Diseases, Robert Koch Institute, Bernhard Nocht Institute, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Hasso lattner Institute and SAP consolidated their efforts and expertise in an interdisciplinary committee to build the Surveillance. Outbreak and Response Management System, a management tool to support identifying emerging infections and suspected cases as well as their contacts and leveraging immediate information exchange between all involved parties of outbreak control. " onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Better diagnostics for a better therapy

Alere GmbH " text="The Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa requires to strengthen the disease surveillance and control capabilities. In October 2014, the Helmholtz Center for Infectious Diseases, Robert Koch Institute, Bernhard Nocht Institute, Nigeria Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Hasso lattner Institute and SAP consolidated their efforts and expertise in an interdisciplinary committee to build the Surveillance. Outbreak and Response Management System, a management tool to support identifying emerging infections and suspected cases as well as their contacts and leveraging immediate information exchange between all involved parties of outbreak control. " onload="closed"]

2. Approaches for new anti infective therapies

 

[simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Good bacteria as a chance – Probiotics & FMT

University of Cologne, Clinic for Internal Medicine - Dr. Liss" text="The overall goal of this research group from Cologne, represented by Dr. Liss, is the creation and validation of hypotheses regarding the influence of the human microbiome on different clinical pictures. With this knowledge probiotics or even a fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) can be used to treat chronic diseases such as the C. difficile colitis where other therapeutic treatments are stretched to their limits. " onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Novel antibacterial substances

Helmholtz Institute for Infection Research, Department of Chemical Biology - Prof. Brönstrup " text="Infections caused by pathogenic bacteria represent a major health threat that is expected to rise further in the future. The need for novel antibiotics is currently not met by the pipeline of drugs in development, in particular in the area of infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria. Our efforts to generate novel antibacterial lead substances using modern methods of chemical biology will be highlighted, and a perspective for young researchers on how to get engaged in this area is provided." onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Different antivirulence concepts

University of Bern, Institute of Anatomy, A. Draeger

University of Zurich, Department of Plant & Microbial Biology, Mr. Weigert

University of Konstanz, Department of Chemistry, Mr. Szamosvari" text="Conventional antibiotics select strongly for resistance and are consequently losing efficacy worldwide. Extracellular quenching of shared virulence factors could represent a more promising strategy because of several effects, that will be explained at the exhibition.

 

University of Bern, Institute of Anatomy, A. Draeger

Inspired by the principles that govern natural toxin-host interactions, Ms. Draeger has engineered artificial liposomes that are tailored to effectively compete with host cells for toxin binding. Liposome-bound toxins are unable to lyse mammaliancells in vitro. These artificial liposomes are used as decoy targets to sequester bacterial toxins that are produced during active infection in vivo.

 

University of Zurich, Department of Plant & Microbial Biology, Mr. Weigert

Mr. Weigert and his colleagues use gallium to quench the iron-scavenging siderophores secreted and shared among pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, and quantitatively monitored its effects on growth in vitro.
Visit our exhibition to see the results and the potential of this research approach for prospective antiinfective therapies.

 

University of Konstanz, Department of Chemistry, Mr. Szamosvari

The Department of Chemistry in Konstanz is developing several synthetic virulence inhibitors as well as new antibiotics against multiresistant MRSA. We are looking forward to learn more about that at our exhibition!" onload="closed"] [simnor_toggle icon="medkit" heading="Phage therapy – an old idea as prospective therapy

Leibniz Institute DSMZ, German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures - Phages, Plasmids and E.coli, Dr. Rohde

Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Pharmacy - PhD Student, Mr. Eisele" text="Leibniz Institute DSMZ, German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures - Phages, Plasmids and E.coliDr. Rohde

The DSMZ is one of the largest biological resource centers worldwide. Its collections currently comprise more than 50.000 items, including about 27.000 different bacterial and 4.000 fungal items as well as phages, deposited in a special collection, that have the potential to be used in human medical therapy. What potential and which limits are behind this idea? What are strategic priorities towards realizing phage application in Europe? Visit our exhibition to get answers!

 

Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Pharmacy - PhD Student, Mr. Eisele
In a DZIF project (German Center for Infection Research) several research groups from different universities, including München, Tübingen and Münster, are working on an alternative to antibiotics - a bacteriophage endolysin, called HY-133. All these lysins are based on the same principle: cleavage of peptidoglycans in bacterial cell walls leads to disruption of the cell wall and therefore to extrusion of the cytoplasmic membrane. Very low concentrations are sufficient to damage cells in an extent that leads do cell lysis. Due to its good compatibility, side effects normally known with the use of antibiotics are reduced to a minimum. Since only a certain bacterial strain is affected, adverse effects connected to normal antibiotics non-specificity, like antibiotic- associated diarrhea can be avoided. HY-133 is supposed to be administered in the nasal cavity, since it is known that colonization of the nasal cavity with S. aureus and development of MRSA infections are linked. " onload="closed"]

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